Pornography Psychology

Pornography Psychology

Introduction

Modern pornography has manipulated society into a clash of irresistible pleasure and moral dilemma. The problem is there is no problem with porn in itself. Rather, in the way society intakes it.

The overall concern lies in how the youth is developing their perspective of sex through porn. However, the promiscuous behavior it evokes isn’t what we should worry about. Instead, we should look into the emotion that drives this promiscuity. Though it may be a dying idea, the feelings of lovemaking are what we’re missing through modern pornography.

The goal of this blog is to clear up that emotion porn gives us. To understand why it makes us feel so compulsive. Differentiating the good and bad of this compulsivity. And to bring a new idea to love making. An idea I could only imagine through watching pornography. Continue reading

Labeling People with Mental Disorders

Labeling People with Mental Disorders

Introduction

The term “mental disorder” is a riveting assertion in and of itself. According to News Week, about 42.5 million American adults are labeled with a “mental illness”. This would mean that one in every five people have some sort of irregularity with their thought process.

I often find that “mental disorders” are simply exaggerated emotions. Every person alive has feared at one time or another. Yet, only so few of us are treated for anxiety, which in essence, is just the overabundance of fear.

You and I both have had emotions that changed rather sporadically. Or long periods of sadness. Or even eaten a little too much at once. In those moments, we could’ve been labeled as bipolar. Or depressed. Or even disorderly eating. Instead, we accepted them as normal mistakes.

I had this friend back in high school who was diagnosed with schizophrenia our junior year. Nearly six years have passed and he admits his emotions have changed. Struggling now with what was once a blossoming charisma.

In a recent interview, he had told me, “-if a doctor never mentioned that something was wrong with me, I would’ve assumed I was just like everyone else. It’s hard not to trust the doctor when everyone around you does.”

Continue reading