America’s Heroin Epidemic

America’s Heroin Epidemic

Introduction

I currently work for an upscale rehabilitation website. Writing blogs about what you’d expect. However, there was one topic of discussion that caught my interest. I figured I should talk about it here.

It may or may not come as a surprise that America is currently facing a heroin epidemic. I wouldn’t have believed this myself if I hadn’t seen it first hand a couple of years ago.

It started with a friend’s cousin who was addicted. He came off as an unlikely victim due to his family’s wealth. Yet, no one denied this cousin had a drug problem. He’d steal money, consistently lie, and often leave for long periods of time. As soon as my friend began making decisions for himself, he fell victim too.

For some reason, this didn’t strike me as anything odd. I had hung around the two while they were doped out (an East Coast term for being high on heroin) as if it was nothing out of the ordinary. The sad truth I had yet to understand was that this was becoming the ordinary. At least for people like me who found themselves in the local drug scene.

This all ended as poorly as you’d expect. My friend overdosed in his house. The cousin was with him and gave CPR which miraculously saved his life. Authorities were called and he was safely hospitalized.

Since this point, I have constructed my own opinions on the matter that I’d like to discuss here.

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The Profusion of Fear

The Profusion of Fear

Introduction

I think it’s obvious to say that the news only conceives of the worst possible scenarios as a way to fuel our society’s ever-growing paranoia. But without our consent, news networks would cease to find the feedback they wholesomely desire. Therefore, I question why we perpetuate ourselves into the darkest of places within our society. And I don’t feel cautious when proclaiming that we enjoy this perpetuation beyond our own control.

Every day, millions are eating up the worst possible information as if they’re at the buffet. And for what reason? As a means to keep ourselves knowledgeable of current events? Or is there more substance that’s being ignored?

My explanation is simple but has much room for expansion. I believe we watch the news as a way to sedate ourselves with certain emotions. And the people controlling these news networks continue to feed us these emotions as a way of manipulation. An influence in which the end result is always the two substances running our society; money and power. Continue reading

Pornography Psychology

Pornography Psychology

Introduction

Modern pornography has manipulated society into a clash of irresistible pleasure and moral dilemma. The problem is there is no problem with porn in itself. Rather, in the way society intakes it.

The overall concern lies in how the youth is developing their perspective of sex through porn. However, the promiscuous behavior it evokes isn’t what we should worry about. Instead, we should look into the emotion that drives this promiscuity. Though it may be a dying idea, the feelings of lovemaking are what we’re missing through modern pornography.

The goal of this blog is to clear up that emotion porn gives us. To understand why it makes us feel so compulsive. Differentiating the good and bad of this compulsivity. And to bring a new idea to love making. An idea I could only imagine through watching pornography. Continue reading

Labeling People with Mental Disorders

Labeling People with Mental Disorders

Introduction

The term “mental disorder” is a riveting assertion in and of itself. According to News Week, about 42.5 million American adults are labeled with a “mental illness”. This would mean that one in every five people have some sort of irregularity with their thought process.

I often find that “mental disorders” are simply exaggerated emotions. Every person alive has feared at one time or another. Yet, only so few of us are treated for anxiety, which in essence, is just the overabundance of fear.

You and I both have had emotions that changed rather sporadically. Or long periods of sadness. Or even eaten a little too much at once. In those moments, we could’ve been labeled as bipolar. Or depressed. Or even disorderly eating. Instead, we accepted them as normal mistakes.

I had this friend back in high school who was diagnosed with schizophrenia our junior year. Nearly six years have passed and he admits his emotions have changed. Struggling now with what was once a blossoming charisma.

In a recent interview, he had told me, “-if a doctor never mentioned that something was wrong with me, I would’ve assumed I was just like everyone else. It’s hard not to trust the doctor when everyone around you does.”

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